Featured Athlete

Featured Athlete

blog/josh_running.jpgJosh Fitchitt - Coach, Triathlete, Adventure Racer

“The g-force UT is the best trainer I’ve ever used – no other trainer can compare to it”

As a triathlete and triathlon coach, I am a big g-force UT fan. Not only has this bike helped me take my own training to the next level, it has made a remarkable difference in the performance of the triathlete team members I coach.  Everyone on my team this year has significantly improved – their power output is up, and they are riding harder and faster. My team is going to show remarkable improvements in their performance this season, and I attribute it to riding this bicycle.

Training with power and measuring my watts when riding the UT has given me a competitive edge in my own training program. For the past 6 ½ years I’ve been doing triathlon all distance sprint Olympics, Half Ironman, Ironman, and Ironman Distance. Using the g-force UT helped me increase my watt output from 220 to 330 watts and to qualify for the age group world championships representing Team USA at the gold coast of Australia this September. Come see my training tips and what I am doing this summer to get ready for this 5 day once in a lifetime experience
Read Blog

 

HOW I GOT HOOKED ON TRIATHLONS

In 2001 I was feeling very confident in my skills as a Personal Training and marathon coach.  Then I was approached by a client that wanted to race Ironman Canada.  I dove into Joel Friels “Triathletes Training Bible.”  I started to go through ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) research on triathlon training.  It quickly became a personal quest to design the most efficient training plan for triathlon training.  After a month of research and a number of mock up periodazation schedules for my client I finally presented her with the 11 month training plan.  She followed the plan and qualified for the Ironman World Championships in Kona.  I was so happy for my client, but I need to experience the racing aspect of triathlon for myself.

In 2002 I signed up for my first triathlon.  It was an Olympic distance race in eastern Washington.  I felt that I would not need to train much for the race because I was playing basketball in a league and lifting on a regular basis.  This turned out to be a big mistake.  I showed up to the race with a Speedo bathing, bike and helmet, and an old pair of running shoes.  As I was setting my bike up in the transition area I noticed every bike had aero bars except mine.  Everyone was putting on wet suits, and talking about their most recent races.  I started to feel a bit underprepared.

As the gun went off for the swim start, I was swimming in the middle of the lead pack.  I was pummeled with kicks and one athlete swam over me.  I ran out of gas about a ¼ mile into the swim.  The next 25 min were very humbling as swimmer after swimmer past me in the water.  As I came out of the water and stumbled to transition I noticed that almost every bike was out of the transition area.  I was determined to make up some time.

On the bike I rode as fast and hard as I could.  I passed many competitors.  However, when I got off the bike to run the 10 K my legs were like noodles.  Just about every athlete I passed on the bike came back and passed me on the run.  I finally stumbled across the finish line almost 3 hours after the start of the race.  I was embarrassed about my performance and lack of preparation.  I was determined to train correctly and redeem myself in 2003.

I started swim classes and purchased a triathlon bicycle.  I went back to researching triathlon training plans.  I read more books about the sport.  I was determined to race a Sprint, Olympic, Half-Ironman and Ironman in the summer of 2003.  I followed my training plan to the letter.  The summer of 2003 I met all of the time and race goals that I set for myself and I fell in love with the sport of triathlon.

 

MORE ON TEAM USA: 

www.usatriathlon.org

Team USA was created by USA Triathlon to be a team of age group/amateurs who best represent the United States and compete in the International Triathlon Union's (ITU) world championships, which attracts the best athletes representing over 50 countries each year. Between 16 and 18 members per age group, depending on the event, make up Team USA. Age groups are fielded in five-year increments up to 90 years of age. Athletes are current Team USA members up through the completion of the world championship event at which they qualified for and in which they competed.

Team USA World championship teams are fielded for:

  • Short Course (Olympic) triathlon (1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run)
  • Long course triathlon (2X Olympic distance)
  • Sprint distance triathlon (1/2 Olympic distance)
  • Short course duathlon (10K run, 40K bike, 5K run)
  • Long course duathlon (18k run, 74k bike, 9k run)
  • Aquathlon (2.5K run, 1K swim, and 2.5K run)
  • Winter triathlon (distances based on the location - disciplines: trail run, mountain bike, cross country ski)

MORE ON THE 2009 WORLD TRIATHLON CHAMPIONSHIPS: 

www.worldtriathlongoldcoast.com

The 2009 Gold Coast ITU Triathlon World Championships presents five days of triathlon competition, community activities, evening entertainment programs, corporate events and functions, along with one of the biggest Sport & Lifestyle Expos in the Southern Hemisphere. There are events for everyone, from novice to elite, corporate to lifestyle enthusiasts.
The Event will see the inclusion of the newly developed Dextro Energy Triathlon – ITU World Championship Grand Final. An exclusive eight race series featuring the world’s best triathletes competing in iconic cities around the globe for World Championship points. The World Champion will be crowned at the Grand Final on the Gold Coast as part of the Gold Coast ITU Triathlon World Championships.

Downoad PDF